The Mississippi by Raft

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Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. Louis Day 12 Hoppie's 0 miler Day 13 um The Mississippi River. Course of the River Rising at an elevation of 1, ft in Lake Itasca, Minn, the Mississippi flows through several glacial lakes to Minneapolis-Saint Paul, where it passes over a series of rapids and is joined by the Minnesota River. Flood Control In its lower section the Mississippi is subject to disastrous flooding.

Navigation and Economic Use The lower river, which has a relatively narrow but deep channel, is navigable for oceangoing ships upstream to Baton Rouge, La. Share this: Reddit Facebook More Twitter. Like this: Like Loading Cool blog about the Mississippi River! Thanks for the info. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Enter your comment here Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:. Email Address never made public. Asheville NC Firefighters. Blog Stats , floating along.

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Post to Cancel. By continuing to use this website, you agree to their use. The summer of saw the last log raft, of Minnesota white pine, pushed down river by the Ottumwa Belle. Memories of sawmill years lingered in Rock Island, even though that last raft changed our history forever. For years after the mills closed there was more than just memory —there was smoke.

One of the byproducts of sawmills is sawdust. Lots of sawdust. After decades of sawing wood, the mills were pretty much surrounded by sawdust, covered by layers of river silt. As a result, even 20 years after all the local mills closed, there were underground sawdust fires. In the west end sawmill area, sawdust fires regularly occurred along the river from Third to Thirteenth Avenues.

Check it out, and notice the photographic RiverWay markers near the Kahlke boatyards in the west end and the other near the railroad bridge at 27 th Street. The 27 th Street photo shows another log raft, penned up awaiting sawing in the adjacent sawmill. This article by Diane Oestreich is slightly modified from the original, which appeared in the Rock Island Argus and Moline Dispatch on February 3, We are a city-wide organization in Rock Island, Illinois, that advocates for preservation of our built environment through public education, research of historic buildings and sites and registration of significant historical places with local, state and federal authorities.

Interested in learning more about how you can get involved? Donations are also welcome. Previous Postcard. Next Postcard. Our Mission We are a city-wide organization in Rock Island, Illinois, that advocates for preservation of our built environment through public education, research of historic buildings and sites and registration of significant historical places with local, state and federal authorities.

I used to be a Mississippi river towboat pilot, and still am involved in the commercial towing industry, and I am not amiss when I say that we all dread the coming of summer and the '"rafters," most of whom have no concept of how to safely navigate on the river. It's enough to give you an ulcer. WoodButcher , Jan 27, Dont forget that the people that made this great nation out of a wilderness tried and suceeded in some "damnfool adventures".


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Life without risk is a waste of time. I'd love to raft down America's great rivers, and would expect those who ply the same waters for profit to co-operate. Its like riding a bicycle down the highway.

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Not the safest thing to do, but possible, legal, and frequently done. I fully agree with Woodbutcher that one should do their homework before trying it. As for the original post, I would think that a quiet 4-stroke outboard would be worth many paddles! Therefore, the right of way.

If you have a magic way of stopping a barge train in less than two miles it would be interesting to know.

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Gonzo, I recognize the very real danger of the idea, but wouldn't let that stop me. Certainly the barge trains have the "right of way", but no single faction should have the exclusive "right" to the use of the waterway. We have a similar situation here where a fuel transfer station has been erected offshore right over my favorite fishing grounds. Now its illegal to transit within several hundred yards of the area, much less drop the hook for some fishing.

Who owns the "rights" to mother nature? I'm with Capt'nD on this one. This country has enough people living their lives in front of the tv. We've become a nation of risk managers, not risk takers. For some reason I've had this idea of "setting out for the territories" on a home made raft. Their raft was quite the production too. The people they met along the way loved it. They got thru the locks. Seemed the lockmasters even got a kick out of em.

Log Raft on Mississippi » RIPS

And when they're on their death bed, they can look back and say they did it. Cool forum.


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I think you should consider at least building a boatlike vessel so you have some maneuverability. Having sailed lake Peppin and St Croix I know that there are a lot of tight spots where you don't want to be unable to get around the barges. The current always takes the long way so it may fling you across the river or leave you stranded on the inside of a curve. Something with 4 oars, a couple of leeboards and a sail would make sense since you could row it with enough power to get out of the way.

Sailing in itself is not enough because the wind tends to bend at least some in the direction of the river - a tacking duel in a headwind on a busy river might be an adventure but not for very long.